WINTER IN SOUTHWESTERN MICHIGAN

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Looking at the North Pier from the South Pier showing how the Ice forms on the safety railings. 

In this photo a lot of the North Pier Catwalk has no Ice. 

Sometimes that is because the Catwalk is Iron painted Black and the Ice melts off of it in the winter sunlight.

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This is the upper portion of a ladder in an opening in the Safety Railing on the South Pier.

Some of them only have ladders on the side of the pier, leaving an open space where you see the orange ladder. 

The way the Ice forms on makes it look as if "It's got teeth".

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North Pier Ice Covered Catwalk

 

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South Pier Ice covered Light.

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Another view on a different day of the South Pier Light with less Ice.

 If you look closely at both photos, you can see the round pipe and a Tri-Angle sign that is a little platform

that the light is on, all the rest is the built up ice.

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South side of the North Pier Catwalk. 

Wolly Mamoth's all in a row.  That's what this made me think of when I saw it. This stuff is massive.

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North side of the North Pier Catwalk looking East. 

You can see how the Ice is on an angle because it formed in very strong wing.

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North side of the North Pier Catwalk looking West. 

You can see how the Ice is on an angle because it formed in very strong wind.

 

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North side of the North Pier Catwalk looking West. 

You can see how the Ice is on an angle because it formed in very strong wing.

It had warmed up and most of the Ice on the surface of the pier had melted and slid off into the lake.

 

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You can see how the Ice is on an angle because it formed in very strong wing. 

It's melting and you can see the water drops.

 

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Just how does the Ice form on the piers, well all it takes is the Wind, Waves and Cold temps. 

This is an example of what happens when the wind driven waves crash into the pier.

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History

The St. Joseph Historic Lighthouse and catwalk, located on the city's North Pier, was erected at the mouth of the St. Joseph River in 1832.  It was one of the first two lighthouses built on Lake Michigan.  In 1859, a replacement lighthouse was built on the bluff.  The tower and beacon were constructed first.  The keeper's house was built around it later.  That beacon was replaced by range lights after the north and south piers were built in 1907 and 1919, respectively.  St. Joseph and Grand Haven boast the only remaining two-pier range light systems with both towers and catwalks intact.  The outer light rests on a steel structure about 35 feet tall.  The inner light is about 57 feet tall and contained in a larger building.  The two-story steel-sided structure has a red hip roof.  An octagonal tower rises an additional two stories above the house and is topped by a black iron parapet and walkway.  A catwalk extends over 300 yards from shore to the second story of the lighthouse.  Catwalks were built so that lighthouse keepers could access the lights when the sea was rough and the waves were crashing over the pier making it too slippery to walk on.  The walkway continues on to the outer light.  In 1995, the current North Pier lighthouse was featured by the U.S. Postal Service in a series of commemorative Great Lakes Lighthouse stamps.

 

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A Cold Winters Eve

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Winter Night Lights

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Sculptured by the Elements

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Hiding in plain sight

 

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The Nickel Plate Road ‘Super-power’ steam locomotive no. 765

Photos taken on a overcast, foggy and rainy Saturday May 28, 2011   

The 765, after repairs, waiting in the rail yard at the Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum

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The 765 approaching a crossing near English Lake between North Judson and LaCrosse

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The 765 starting out in the rain from the Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum for LaCrosse

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The Nickel Plate Road steam locomotive no. 765, a 2-8-4 Berkshire-type locomotive, with two pony wheels, eight driving wheels, and four trailing wheels, stands 15 feet tall, weighs 404 tons, and goes over 60 miles an hour.  It was built in 1944 and went into service as one of the 80 Berkshire locomotives operating on the the Nickel Plate Road, a high-speed freight line. 

The 765 was taken out of service in the 1950's.  It was then acquired by the City of Fort Wayne and put on display in a city park in 1963.  In 1972, the Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society was incorporated to find a way to care for the 765.  After several years it was restored to full operating condition and went back into service in 1979.  It then ran for fourteen years as a special excursion train all over the mid-west, travelling as far east to New Jersey, and south to Georgia, traveling over 52,000 miles and carrying over 100,000 passengers. 

The 765 appeared in two feature films: 1981’s “Four Friends” and 1987’s “Matewan.” 

Then from 1993 to 2005, the 765 was taken out of service again and completely rebuilt.  It's now back in the passenger excursion business, ready for another hundred thousand people.

The Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum has partnered with Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society and scheduled the 765 for May 28th, 29th, and 30th, June 18th, 19th, and July 2nd, 2011 for "Steam Excursions".  The 765 will depart from the Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum in North Judson, Indiana, and will traverse the former Chesapeake & Ohio mainline to LaCrosse, Indiana, and return - a round-trip distance of 20 miles.

If you do a web search for "765 locomotive videos" (without quotes) you'll get thousands of hits of videos from all over the mid-west of the 765, including some from the Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum in North Judson, Indiana.


For more information visit http://www.hoosiervalley.org and http://www.fortwaynerailroad.org.
 

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Hope you enjoyed the photos 

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All Photos Copyright 2006 - 2017 Tom B McCall

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